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Social Do’s and Don’ts. Lessons From The Guy Who Licked a Stack of Tacos

Let’s play a little game. It’s called, what do you think happened to the Taco Bell employee who licked a stack of tacos, took a picture and posted it to social media? Yeah … He was let go. In a split second, his LOL-moment unintentionally made him SOL. Whether we like it or not, how […]

Let’s play a little game. It’s called, what do you think happened to the Taco Bell employee who licked a stack of tacos, took a picture and posted it to social media?

Yeah … He was let go. In a split second, his LOL-moment unintentionally made him SOL.

Whether we like it or not, how we portray ourselves on social networking sites has a direct effect on how people perceive us.

“But what don’t I care if someone doesn’t like what I post,” you ask? Because we’re guessing you’d like to keep your job – or get one.

Did you know that hiring managers actually go online to research candidates? In fact, according to Jobvite’s 2013 Social Recruiting Results, 93 percent of recruiters are likely to look at a candidate’s social profile and 78 percent of recruiters have hired through a social network.

They’re searching Google, Twitter and Facebook to get a sense of who you are and how you’d fit into the company.

So if licking tacos is an example of what NOT to do, what, then what should you be posting? Here’s a list of Do’s and Don’ts to improve your chances of getting a job in the restaurant industry.

DO

***Do complete the “About” section*

Include as much information as possible about your education, work experience, interests, and anything personal that is appropriate.

Do include a profile picture with personality

If you’re looking for a job in the restaurant industry, you probably want to appear upbeat, personable and friendly.

Do make your social accounts consistent

For example, if you show your work title as a server on LinkedIn, then your work title on Facebook should also show that you are a server.

Do develop a network among colleagues, friends, and family

Ever heard of the six degrees of separation concept? It’s the theory that everyone and everything is six or fewer steps away, by way of introduction. You never know who in your circle of family and friends will be the path to your next job.

Do share personal and professional successes

Do you have repeat customers who you love? What about some awesome #Tipworthy moments? Use your social media profiles to share personal and professional successes and accomplishments in order to make a good impression.

Do ask for recommendations

Tap your former co-workers, managers or employers and ask if they will post a positive recommendation on social networks that offer those features. Better yet, offer to return the favor.

DON’T

Don’t post sexual or vulgar pictures

Research shows that 71 percent of recruiters reacted negatively to posts and tweets that were sexual in nature.

Don’t discuss negative work issues

This is a tough one. When something goes wrong our little fingers want to shout it from the rooftops! The injustice of it all is far easier to cope with when other people know your pain. Either cut the habit cold turkey, or get creative with the way you express your unhappiness with the customer who responded to “How are you doing?” with “Lemon water no ice.”

Don’t use profanity

Research shows 65 percent of recruiters reacted negatively toward profanity. This is another hard one for restaurants. Even corporate environments are loosening their ties on this one. A few four letters words here and there never really hurt anyone, but if you start sounding like Courtney Love, it might be time to scale back.

Don’t reference illegal drugs

Research shows that majority – 83 percent of recruiters – reacted negatively toward the mention of illegal drugs. That’s a pretty overwhelming statistic.

Don’t use incorrect grammar and misspellings

Over 50 percent of recruiters looked upon misspellings and incorrect grammar negatively – even more than alcohol use – while searching candidate profiles.

 

Social networks can help you acquire a job as long as you are smart about how to portray yourself. Go online and check your profiles as if you are the hiring manager, and see if you are putting your best online profile forward.

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