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Let’s #Not And Say We Did: What To Eliminate From Your Social Pages

News flash: we’re all online. All the time. According to the Pew Research Internet Project , approximately 74% of those with access to the internet use social media. Included in that 74% are recruiters, headhunters, and hiring managers looking to get a better view of who you are as a person, because let’s face it […]

News flash: we’re all online. All the time.

According to the Pew Research Internet Project , approximately 74% of those with access to the internet use social media. Included in that 74% are recruiters, headhunters, and hiring managers looking to get a better view of who you are as a person, because let’s face it – resumes and interviews don’t always accomplish that.

Reality is, some of those Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram posts can land you in serious hot water. Let’s remember the young woman who was fired before her first day at a pizza place because she decided to complain about it on her Twitter account. It’s your choice to share, but keep in mind you could be risking your chances of getting a new job or even keeping the position you already have.

Your social pages are basically your personal advertisements. You’re building a brand here, people!n

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  • Be outgoing
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  • Be yourself
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  • But be conscious
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What’s your end goal? Are you on these channels to network? Socialize? Either way, people are looking. Don’t let your social media channels hold you back.

Pay close attention to these tips on what to leave off the web – for good:

Complaints About Your Job

This is one of the worst offenses someone can make. If you’ve had a bad day, week or month, the last place to vent is online. Your current employer may never see your comments, but there’s always the chance a future employer will. Or worse – a fellow employee with a chip on his or her shoulder.

Takeaway: #HandleIt. Save yourself the drama and address the situation head-on. Even if you and your manager don’t end up seeing eye-to-eye, you’ve earned their respect in the workplace. Or you can make a more informed decision about your future.

Passive Aggressive Comments

There’s a lyric to go with every mood, person, and situation. That doesn’t mean you need to put those cryptic words on blast to your 700+ Facebook friends when someone at work crosses you. Nine times out of ten you’ll delete this post later, making it seem like you can’t handle your emotions.

Takeaway: Leave the salt for your fries. Grudges can only last so long, but your social-savvy friends and coworkers will always remember the time you took to call them out – not so discreetly.

Inappropriate Photos

While you may have already deleted all your Facebook albums after starting this article, take a look at your tagged photos as well. These are often overlooked – but not by employers. We’re talking sloppy nights, excess bae pics, and anything downright vulgar. If you have public accounts, employers can use these images as a benchmark of how you’ll perform on the job .

Takeaway: Snap your best foot forward. What if your Instagram was filled with such great food shots, your manager hires you to be the official ‘grammer of the company? Leave your options open. Keep it clean, folks!

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