Image back
Blog

5 Interview Questions for Finding the Perfect Match for Your Culture

By: David Niu, TINYpulse Finding the right candidate means more than picking the resume that lists all the requirements from your job description. Sure, that’s important, but we all know that there’s something else you look for – something a little harder to quantitatively measure. That “something” is cultural fit. Cultural fit is about finding […]

By: David Niu, TINYpulse

Finding the right candidate means more than picking the resume that lists all the requirements from your job description. Sure, that’s important, but we all know that there’s something else you look for – something a little harder to quantitatively measure. That “something” is cultural fit.

Cultural fit is about finding employees who will get along with the people in your company and match your organization’s values and vision. And it’s important for companies all over the world, according to findings from Cubiks and TINYpulse :

    • n

    • 82% of companies say that measuring cultural fit is important

n

    • n

    • 75% of companies say cultural fit indicates job performance “well to very well”

n

    • n

    • Peers and camaraderie are the number one reason employees go the extra mile at work

n

After all, you don’t want to spend the time hiring and training a new employee only to find that their personality and principles are totally incompatible with the company.

The problem is that it’s hard to judge a candidate’s potential fit just by looking at their resume. You have to talk to them for that. So use the interview as a time to gauge how well a person will mesh with your company. Here are a few questions that will help you do that.

1. What’s your ideal work environment?

You want your candidate to adapt to your company environment, whether it’s a nimble startup or 150-year-old organization. Do you need someone who works independently or a team player who thrives on group brainstorming? This question lets you assess quickly how well they’ll fit in your particular workplace.

2. What would be your perfect day at work?

Just like the first question, this one reveals what a candidate wants in their workplace. Are they telecommuters who hate being in the office but are willing to work odd hours? Do they like to jump from project to project or prefer to focus on one task all day? You know what kind of work style your company has, so you can easily tell when someone’s a good fit.

3. What is the biggest misrepresentation people have of you?

This is a great question for getting an accurate view of the candidate. It can give you useful information that you would have missed from your first impression. Maybe someone you would’ve judged as cold is actually just shy. Or someone who looks intimidating is really quite open to input and criticism.

4. If I called up your last boss, how would they describe you?

Candidates are remarkably honest when asked this question. They’ll share all their good qualities – and probably one or two negative ones too. You can evaluate if those negative qualities are easy to deal with or deal breakers.

5. Tell me about your least favorite manager.

Your candidate’s answer to this question will tell you which traits they hate in their workplace – and raise vital red flags if they’re incompatible with the supervisor they’d be working with. Compare their answer with the leadership style at your company, like how hands on the managers are and how strict the hierarchy is. If the qualities they list are ones you carefully cultivate, it’s time to show the candidate the door.

These questions are some of the most important ones you’ll ask in an interview. Maybe even more important than questions about specific skills or background experience. Remember that skills can be taught – but personality can’t. On-the-job training can fix skill gaps, whereas the wrong cultural fit is more trouble than even the most experienced candidate is worth.

Don't just dream of being awesome. Get a Demo